PAUL SIGNAC

Paul Signac (1863 – 1935) was a French pioneer of Neo-Impressionism who, at the age of 18 after attending a Monet exhibition decided to pursue a career as a painter.  Working alongside the iconic Georges Seurat, Signac helped to develop the Pointillist painting style (small dots of pure colour).

Signac is famed for his scientifically juxtaposed small dots of colour, intended to combine and blend not on the canvas but in the viewer's eye, the defining feature Pointillism.  Many of Signac's paintings are of the French coast, which combined his love of sailing and painting water.  Signac painted alongside, influenced and collaborated with some of the most influential artists of the 20th century including Vincent van Gogh - who he frequently visited, Claude Monet, Odilon Redon and Henri Matisse.

Signac's impact on 20th-century art landscape was profound. His career spanned half a century until his death in Paris on 15 August 1935, and his works can be found among the world's most prestigious art institutions, including the Louvre in Paris and The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.